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British Heart Foundation engage Twitter users with beautifully simple campaign

This isn't so much a blog post, but we couldn't help but love the simplicity and impact of the latest British Heart Foundation campaign on Twitter. Their presence on Twitter will of course be part of a wider digital strategy which will include other social channels such as Facebook, Instagram and engagement through email marketing. There's little to be gained from focusing all your marketing efforts in the same place, especially where everyone has at some point been touched by the consequences of a heart attack.

Not only is the campaign simple and easy to engage with, but it takes advantage of the heart 'like' feature in Twitter and uses relevant emoji's for additional brand impact.

It all starts with a simple promoted tweet. Setting something like this up for your own digital marketing campaign is easy and can be done based on a number of clear objectives. Twitter's campaign options include increasing engagement, getting more followers or following a direct link to a website landing page, with charges based on a simple pay per click model. The great thing about advertising on social platforms is the level of targeting available. These companies know more about us that we ourselves do sometimes, so you can be laser focused on who you want to start a conversation with.

Back to the BHF, their campaign is so simple, it wouldn't even have needed to use any of Twitter's built in campaign builders to set up - it's nothing more than a standard tweet that anyone could post from any device.

BHF tweet campaign

The promoted tweet from the British Heart Foundation

I couldn't help but 'like' this tweet, but its what happens next that really makes their message hit home.

Using the equivalent of an automated email auto-responder, they @reply you with this.

The BHF use cold hard facts tell you bluntly that if you'd just had a heart attack, there's a fair chance you'd have just become another statistic and may have died.

It's a powerful message that makes you think. Following the link keeps the engagement, with the clickthrough taking you to a landing page featuring a video and call to action to learn CPR and potentially save a life.

Not much more to say, other than a genius campaign, incredibly simple and likely to be a very cost effective way to get their message out to a specific demographic. I just hope that by being in that demographic I'm not about to croak it. ❤️