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The Clientside Podcast

Podcasting with James Mulvany

The Clientside Podcast

35 min James Mulvany

In this episode of the Clientside Podcast, Andrew Armitage talks to podcasting expert and founder of radio.co James Mulvany about the many benefits that podcasting can bring to your business and how you can get started. During lockdown digital platforms have seen an increase in use, despite podcasting being something that has been popular for some time, there is still plenty of room in the market!

We talk about James’ career and how his own experiences with podcasting led him to start matchmaker.fm – which he describes as Tinder for podcasters. We discuss the motives behind starting a podcast, the rise of video in the podcasting world and things that you should consider before starting a podcast yourself.

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Andrew:
Welcome back to the Clientside podcast. This is the show that gives you actionable steps to apply to your business, that supports your brand, your digital marketing and your growth. I'm your host, Andrew Armitage and it's good to have you back for another episode, I hope you're doing well and staying safe.

Andrew:
Now during lockdown there has been some noticeable changes in the way people have been consuming media and content. Of course, this perhaps shouldn't come as a huge surprise for many people who have been all locked up with no place to go, digital platforms have seen a massive rise in use, with people across all demographics hungry for content as they while away their time. But for podcasting, it's meteoric rise started well before lockdown, and with the likes of Spotify making huge investments in not only podcast creation platforms but content as well, the ability to start a podcast is getting simpler, especially given that with lock down, many people have started from a kitchen table or as I am right now, under a bunk bed! So amid all this noise around podcasting, my guest today is somebody with plenty of experience in this space. James Mulvany is founder of Radio.co, more recently podcast.co, which is where this very episode is streaming from, and his latest venture, Matchmaker.fm, which he describes as Tinder for podcasters. James is based in Manchester in the UK and this episode is for him one of 40 shows in nearly 40 days as he comes to the end of an epic podcast tour. Welcome to the show, James.

James:
Thanks, Andrew. Thanks very much for having me, what an intro! I think that was really good. Yeah 30 podcasts in 30 days, now it's ended up being more like 40 in 40 days, and who knows? I'll probably just keep going. I mean, this is the thing at the moment. I think this challenge I set myself, given the circumstances, I would not have had the time to be able to do it. You know, normality, when I'm in the office, I've got people coming up to me, you've got meetings. So it's kind of been nice just be able to devote a few hours each day to recording podcasts. Of course, some days when you have, say, three or four and you might have an hour between each, which is fine, but during that hour you can't really get into doing much work. So, it ends up sort of being quite an involved thing. But, yeah, it's been it's been a good journey so far.

Andrew:
Great stuff. So tell us a bit about your background, James. You've been in this space for a while, started with Radio.co and obviously, I suppose there's a natural progression there into podcasting. So how did you get started in all this sector?

James:
In sort of the online broadcasting space, really came from when I was very young I was 16, 17, wanted to go into radio as a D.J., love music, love being behind the microphone and so I started doing the normal things you do, kind of getting work experience, working for different radio stations. The Internet was a kind of new thing then. Well, you know, not new new, but kind of. Certainly we didn't have things like Facebook, so the idea of broadcasting online was just like, astonishing to me and I thought it was really exciting. So I kind of learnt the ropes of how that works and, you know, I was that geeky kid who had a radio show from his bedroom, you know, and we went from there.

James:
I went off to university, built a company called Wave Streaming to begin with, which was selling streaming media services to the broadcast industry. And, probably about six years ago, 2014, the Wave Streaming, we had had a very lucrative deal which was going well and that deal ended. So I kind of thought, right, what's next? What can I do to push the boundaries of where, you know, the sort of services we're providing and more and more customers are coming to us who weren't what you'd imagined to be traditional radio stations, and they were more like brands, D.J's, musicians, you know, charities, all sorts of companies or organisations wanting to use online broadcasting, online radio as a tool to to engage with people.

James:
So we thought, let's create a platform which is sort of super simple to use. And this was to say about 2013, 2014, we launched radio.co in 2015, and then podcast.co came about probably two years, three years into the launch because we were sort of looking at what clients were asking us for in terms of features and where the industry was. And we thought podcasting is a good complementary service to offer. They are two different markets, but there is obviously some crossover in them in the clients we have as well. So yeah, it is a cool place to be and it is great to see a technology that, you know, sort of you've masterminded, if you like, being used to deliver entertainment and education to so many people. You know on radio.co, we serve hundreds of millions of listeners every single week across our client station. So we have about four and a half thousand radio stations using our platform now. And podcast.co is kind of pretty much growing rapidly. And obviously then matchmaker.fm which has come about more recently too.

Andrew:
So what is it about podcasting? I mean, I love to listen to podcasts in the car, although I've not been doing as much driving recently. For me, I just find it, it's a convenient way to digest content. What has really fuelled this huge growth, really? I mean, you talk about sort of that period, 2013, 2014, but podcasting, it started before then, but it took took a while to hit the mainstream, didn't it? So what's what's really fueled it?

James:
I think is a number of things. Firstly, when podcasting first came about the process to actually get a podcast off the internet, put it onto your iPod, was quite involved and probably not, you know, a bit more for the enthusiasts, tech nerds, people like me, you know.

Andrew:
I fall into that category as well.

James:
Exactly. And, I used to get podcasts on my iPod and it was a clunky process to kind of download them. I think, therefore, it was only really reserved for for a few people. Again, not everyone had an iPod.

Andrew:
Sure

James:
Obviously, the rise of smartphones have been useful. And, obviously then when smartphones came around, you could just download them on the go, which makes it more convenient. The rise of things like 4G have meant that, you know, it's quick and easy to access and stream media on the go. Whereas before, again, you know, it was very much, you know, you downloaded then moved it across and then also things more recently like smart speakers. But, I think the real uptake has been driven by, just becoming more mainstream in terms of, there's lots of celebrities getting involved with the medium. And when a celebrity gets involved, with a big following who perhaps aren't really techie type people, they then start listening to podcasts because they think, oh, you know, so-and-so's got a podcast. Whether it's someone in sports or, you know, entertainment or fashion or whatever it might be, they still listen to their podcasts and think, oh, well, that's that person's got a podcast as well. So I listen to that one and then you kind of start that process of discovery and think, you know, there's other podcasts out there, some of which aren't obviously by famous people. And I think, you know, that's probably one of the reasons why the last couple years, it's sort of blown up a bit.

Andrew:
I guess the on-demand nature as well makes it a lot easier. You listen in your own time, don't you? You're not you're not of confined to a schedule or you know, it's like watching catchup TV, isn't it? I mean, you've got now with the BBC sounds app, they are promoting that mainstream, it appears, on their idents in front of TV programs. You've got the likes of Peter Crouch and Gary Lineker even now sitting around his kitchen table. There's just been so much more uptake and I suppose to a certain degree, lockdown will take that even further won't it? There'll be more and more people who probably realize well, I don't need to be in a studio. I don't need to have loads of fancy kit anymore. I can just get by with getting started on smartphone, OK, the quality might leave a bit to be desired, but fundamentally I think for a lot of people it's just about getting started, isn't it.

James:
Yeah. I mean again, it's funny because I've said this on a lot of the podcasts, I've been on. But when people say, well, what advice have you got for people who want to start podcasting? And, actually just getting started is the first step because you can think about something until the cows come home. But you know, actually just taking that plunge is the most important thing to do. You know, I think you do need to, if you're going to be doing as a commercial venture, you know, investing in a good quality microphone is well worthwhile. It'll make you sound ten times better.

Andrew:
And I think I think that's something that people should be doing much more now. If we're using Zoom and things, you know the number of echoey meetings that I've had.

James:
Yes.

Andrew:
Just the difference that some basic lighting and even a good quality mic, it'll be more useful than just podcasting wouldn't it?

James:
Yeah, totally. And also, you know, as I say, we're seeing a lot more clients, as you mentioned, you guys at A Digital are on our platform. I guess that's kind of an interesting question is, what was from from a business perspective, what was your motivation for actually starting a podcast? Because I'd be interested to see if that kind of correlates to my perceptions and also what other clients say to us.

Andrew:
Yeah, I mean, in a nutshell, we wanted to create more content anyway, like most people who have a bit of a marketing plan and it revolves around content. But I think we found ourselves having conversations in the studio that would be really valuable for clients to be a part of. And we thought, oh, if only we could have recorded that conversation. We felt there would be something of value to share with clients that they could have, you know, a quick takeaway, something that could go and try themselves. So that was our motivation, really and, you know, our first series of podcasts was, by and large, just myself and team members. We didn't have a list of people lined up to be guests. I did a solo show. I did a couple of episodes with team members and they were talking around, talking points around things that would come up with particular projects that we were working on, or conversations that we might have had with with one client that we thought actually, that that's something that's come up two or three times now, perhaps we we need to package that up in such a way that we can share it.

Andrew:
It was a case of trying to find a new way of adding value to what we do, but in a medium that, in a way didn't require us to write it all down. It was a bit more free flowing to be able to have it as a conversation and as you know, conversations and the best episodes can weave around in different ways and different directions to make a particular point.

James:
I agree wholeheartedly. You end up having these conversations in the office don't you sometimes, and you think it'd be good if he could just record that, you know, because either you have that kind of aha moment yourself or, one of your team members might do, or it's just that kind of getting together a minds which can end up producing something great or really useful or just let you say is problem solving for for clients. Interestingly, we've just started for radio.co doing a livestream every couple of weeks as just a way of providing more like dynamic support to clients, you know, people who just sign up. Common questions answering, you know, how does this work or how does a section of the platform work or I'm trying to do this and it's not working right. So how can I fix it? And it's because, you know, we take those questions on of course, if it's one person who's got that question or a few people who got a question means many more may do as well. It's a good way of engaging that's not just writing emails, basically.

Andrew:
Yeah. And I think that, you know, once you've got a few episodes of a podcast under your belt, you kind of feel more open that, well I've got over the technology. I could perhaps do a livestream. It opens you up to other channels that you can communicate through and other ways to engage your audience. So like many we've done a few webinars and things like that, but we feel a lot more comfortable in doing it. We've got microphones, we've got some kit to be able to do it. It's just another route that we can engage with our audience, which is really valuable.

Andrew:
So, what what are some of the main things that that people need to consider with a podcast? Because there's this clearly right ways and wrong ways of doing it. You've got a post on your your Linkedin page, I think, to be blunt, not another shit podcast or five ways to create a shit podcast. I can't remember the title of that. There's clearly, you know, people need to get over this initial hurdle just to create content. But there's obviously some ways that you can do a better job with creating and promoting a podcast than others. What are some of the key mistakes that people make where they just think alright, I'm just gonna sit down and fire off a series of episodes?

James:
Yeah, I mean, I think to start off with, let's assume that someone listening to this is going to be doing some sort of commercial intent or commercial reasons versus just doing it for a laugh with their mates. And there's nothing wrong with, if you want to go and record a podcast for a laugh with your mates, go do that. But, you know, our sort of area of specialty is helping organisations and companies succeed.

James:
I think the first thing to do is really ask the question, who is your audience going to be and what sort of podcast do you want? Is it going to be there to generate leads for your business? Is it gonna be there to provide education to existing customers or, you know, new customers or even for larger companies is it there to provide some kind of internal comms for staff? You know, it's a really good way of doing internal comms these days. So I think, you know, if you fall into one of those three categories, you know, you decide what you want and then it's a case of right, how do we measure success of this? So if you're generating leads, you might want to say have a unique URL that you are sending people to and you can track that person's intent. You know, they've come from your podcast and that person that may turn into a customer. You know if you're educating customers, you need to make sure that they're actually listening and engaging with the podcast, you know, have some kind of Q&A or ask for people to sort of send in questions that perhaps you can answer next time. So, I think having a strategy right from the get go is a good thing.

James:
The more interactive you can make it as a business as well, the more indication or the sort of knowledge you'll have of who's actually listening and the fact that they are listening, which is quite important. And the next thing is before you start recording, I think just try and come up with a concept that's somehow going to be unique or has a bit of a strategy versus just kind of making up as you go along. And again, there's no harm in reiterating I think, you know, you mentioned in your first series, it was just you and your colleagues, second series you started having guests on. So I don't think there's any problem with saying, you know, rather than just saying we're going to commit to doing one episode every single week for the rest of this year, which is quite daunting to a lot of people, especially if you're running a company, you don't think, blimey, you know, have we really got the time as a business to devote to this or is just going to be a big waste of time.

James:
So let's try doing six episodes, or eight episode or 12 episode season. Get that out the way, you can always have a couple of months break and come back to it later in the year or the following year, and then try and reiterate, maybe change the direction of it or, you know, think how it could be improved. And also, I think the other thing is, just to get people involved. I think, like you said, it doesn't have to be a solo project. You know the more people you can get sometimes participating in these things, you know, it can make it easier for you and also it can make it more interesting for people listening.

Andrew:
So let's talk about our participation, because this is where Matchmaker comes in, isn't it? Which is your most recent platform. Tell us a bit about matchmaker? Tinder for podcasters you called it?

James:
Tinder for podcasters, yeah. So, we built postcast.co as in a similar format to how we built radio.co. We wanted to make it very simple to use, very clean design and just make it accessible. And, whilst we're building it, we were looking at different ways that we can market and sort of funnel people into signing up or trialling the platform and we looked at the podcasting space, about 60 percent of podcasts are based on having guests on or interviewing people. So, we thought, okay, this is a good little funnel, lets kind of, in a marketing kind of hacky way we set up a couple of pages on the site. One was targeted towards podcasts looking for guests, and one was targeted towards guests who wanted to be featured on more podcasts or industry experts, whatever you wanna call them. These pages were really simple, they just had a Google form, you know. So, there was no product but we kind of made it sound as if they were signing up to some service.

Andrew:
Right. So true startup then?

James:
Yeah. Yeah, absolutely no code MVP. And no code is one of these terms that's being thrown around quite a lot now. But it is what it is. And we kind of didn't really see it at the time as an MVP. I think we were seeing it more as, well we know we could sell podcasting services or the platform to these kind of customer so let's just get some names and emails and some details. But, then we actually got people to fill out almost like a profile about themselves and sort of shows that they wanted to be on, or the show that they were hosting. Surprisingly, people were actually filling out a lot of information and we thought, well, okay, maybe we've got something here. Let's create a platform to connect these two people together, because at the time, we didn't really have a way of connecting them. So that's really how Matchmaker came about. We then probably didn't get around to actually building it until til..we started development the back end of last year and we launched in February this year. And, it's really just taken off. I think, nearly four and a half thousand users and when I started doing this podcast tour, that number was at like 3000. So we've grown by like a thousand half users just in the last month, month and a bit.

Andrew:
So that's proof, proof in the pudding that talking about these things and reaching out to a wider audience really does get the message across.

James:
Yeah, and it's been it's been great as for me as an entrepreneur, as a software sort of developer. I love seeing the fact that we've created this product that is actually building connections and the feedback we've had from people is great. You know, they're saying, I've literally found some really valuable people, made some great friends, built some networking opportunities, whatever, just using your platform and hearing that is so, so refreshing considering, you know, it was really just built as a sort of side project. And, you know, it's gaining so much momentum in the space. And I just think it does fulfill a clear need in the market. And, you know, there's lots of stuff planned.

Andrew:
Yeah, I think it is a challenge. It is a challenge, isn't it, to, or at least it was until Matchmaker came along, a challenge to sort of route out guests and find other shows and podcasts that might have been useful to your audience, depending on whether you wanting to present or appear as a guest. And, you know, I think that was that was certainly one of our fears when it came to starting. And like I said, we started just having conversations with, you know, between our team members. But I can certainly vouch for Matchmaker, it's made life quite a bit easier. It certainly made the second series of podcasts that we've done, something that we've been able to maintain momentum with and reach out into some new sectors and find people not just locally, but from other countries as well, which obviously keeps the sort of the panel of guests, if you like, diverse and hopefully continues to add some value to our listeners.

Andrew:
One thing that we've not done with our podcast and, I think this is about our 15th episode now. So we've pretty much learned the ropes. But, every day's a school day. What's the value of including video with your podcast? Because podcasts were traditionally an audio file that you would listen to through your headphones, you didn't need the video to go with it. But more and more people seem to be combining audio and video together on different platforms. What's your view on that?

James:
I mean, I think it's a good thing that the more content you can create in a short space of time, the better. Ultimately, if you're recording it, even if it's just a Zoom recording like we're doing now, and you can take our little clips of the best bits and repurpose them for Linkedin or for Facebook or whatever platform you might be using. You know,the way I see it, that's free content. It's video content that you otherwise would have had to spend time making. And actually, I think given the current circumstances, people aren't as fussed to see kind of Hi-Fi, Hollywood level productions. I think if the information you've got on the podcasts is really interesting, and you can just dissect the best bits, you know, that's a really, really good, useful bit of short form content that will help promote your podcasts, promote your business, or push your kind of personal brand. Whatever you using it for, really. And also, whenever we have clients in our studio, we try and record it. Obviously some people don't really want it to be recorded via video but generally speaking, we recommend that they do. Again, I think if you're face to face with someone, you just get another dynamic from a video piece of content than audio. But, you know, I think you make a good point earlier that when you say, you know, lots of the time you're listening to podcast driving to work. So there is still a place for the audio only format which podcasts are sort of famous for. You know, weirdly there is actually ability to have a video based podcast within iTunes. I think iTunes or Apple podcast is the only platform that supports it. I don't even know if it supports it now, but the idea of actually just tying a video to each episode, you know, did exist. We don't support it because I think this is the thing, YouTube kind of caters for that really.

Andrew:
And I guess if you've got people who are publishing to your platform, they might be a little bit more tech savvy. So they would be able to go and upload separately to YouTube as well without too much difficulty, maybe.

James:
Yeah, that's what we always do. We just treat it as an extension of your podcast. It's a way of repurposing content and potentially, you know, drawing in a new audience to listen. And the other benefit as well is, of course, having guests, like you mentioned before is, you know, you're spreading your reach even further because you're pushing content out to their networks as well as your own.

Andrew:
Yeah, yeah. I think that's something that we will start and do. Obviously, we're still not quite out of lockdown. We've got our own plans to set up a media studio ourselves to do some more video and podcast work. So hopefully once we get back installed in there and get that space kitted out, we'l certainly be combining some more video work with the podcast that we're recording. And hopefully we will get some guests in as well. But I have a feeling that more of those podcasts coming up over the next few months will be done like this over Zoom rather than face to face.

Andrew:
So another thing that we do with with this podcast is transcribe it, which for me, again, it was another barrier that I thought, oh, it's just another job. It's just something else that is going to take time. There's obvious benefits, I think, in terms of search optimization. And it's a little bit like you say, for video, you're repurposing that same content, you've already created it once. So rather than just have it out on one channel, you put it out in text, video, audio formats as well. Do you do you have a particular view on transcription? Do they have any impact in terms of visibility that is off your website, through through any sort of podcasting channels like Spotify, Apple podcasts, etc?

James:
Well, I think one of the most important and exciting developments in podcasting is Google are obviously starting to pay more more attention to it. They have the best search technology in the world. You know, far better than Apple or Spotify could offer. And Google are starting to, as I understand it, sort of transcribe episodes themselves. So, I'm hoping that will help give your podcasts more context in terms of you're not just searching for the title or the author or whatever, you're actually then looking inside the episode. And if people are typing a question into Google, like, for example, you mentioned search engine optimization, maybe like, what's the best top ten tips for SEO on my website or something like that. You know, we can then actually start learning from podcasts because Google actually understand what's contained within the episode. Obviously at Podcast.co we have an automatic transcription feature which is powered by Amazon, which is, you know, it's good. It's not the best, it's not perfect. And of course, occasionally you have to go for it and basically sort of edit it and fix the mistakes.

Andrew:
I suspect with the variation in accents and all the rest of it, it's probably practically impossible for for a transcription service to be absolutely perfect.

James:
I think, again, it's one of these things, isn't it? In five years, it's probably going to be miles better than it is now, but it's still pretty good. I mean, I think it's at least 75 or 80 percent success rate, something like that.

Andrew:
It beats having to type it all out then, doesn't it?

James:
It does. Yeah. You know, or of course, you can pay someone to do that. You know, you can there's lots of human powered AI transcription services where they'll basically have someone edit it and make sure that it's accurate for you and I think a promise like 99 percent accuracy or something. So, there are other options versus doing it yourself. But, I think you make a good point. You know, there's no harm in turning that into text. You can republish that in a variety of ways. It could be a blog post. You could write it, you know, put it into PDF, some kind of literature that you send out to your clients emails. Take out quotes for social media, there's a whole bunch of things you can do. I definitely think it's worth spending a bit of time doing. The other thing you can do is, actually, you know, if you've got the resource, just try and write an article based on the podcast and just you can take out quotes and then just sort of form a basis of an article around that. It's another good thing to do. Again, it's a little bit time consuming to do that, but, you know, again, it's just another piece of content you are generating from that recording.

Andrew:
And as we know, content is king when it comes to the web and marketing these days. So where next for podcasting? We've talked about video. Obviously, you've got some plans for developing your platforms. There's potentially a lot of noise out there now. It's gone mainstream, lots of people have started a podcast, even though they might not have continued with it. Where's podcast going, what's the future looking like for podcasting?

James:
Well, I think it's quite interesting you mentioned you want to build a studio or in your office, you know, because I think there's going to be more and more companies approaching things like this. You know, we've always been very, very big on content. And obviously the way we do content is to promote our own products and services, you know, as part of podcast.co we're now doing a lot of client based work. But to begin with, it was really just as a mechanism to promote our sort of software platforms. And I've always liked to do that in house, just because I think no one knows your products and services better than you and your team. I think we're going to see more companies doing this. And actually sort of taking this sort of thing in-house, making sure that they're actually not just seeing this as an optional extra. I think podcasting really needs to start form the basis of your marketing mix. You know, it's another way of communicating with clients. Not everyone has time to sit there and watch videos, but you can listen to podcasts, you know, for a much longer period of time as well that's been proven that people are engaged for longer. So, there's a huge benefit to us as marketers, I guess, to have that attention span of sort of 20, 30 minutes versus someone watching 30 seconds of a video and switching off.

James:
In terms of where it's going next, I think, you know, obviously it's continuing to grow. there's no signs of it slowing down. And you know, what's interesting is that the whole sort of battle between Spotify and Apple now, because they've obviously come in, Spotify, this is, and taken a big chunk of the market.

Andrew:
They've made a huge investment, haven't they?

James:
Yeah, but they didn't have podcasts on their platform, I think until end of 2017 or 2018, so it's really new to them.

Andrew:
They've gone all in haven't they.

James:
They have and they've managed to sort of vacuum up a big chunk of what Apple really had the lion's share of for many years. And Apple, I think, had become complacent they just thought, well, you know, everyone's downloading podcasts on our platform, you know, and the word podcast obviously originated from the iPod. I think now obviously Apple are thinking, wow, oh this is actually more serious than perhaps they thought. And so rather than resting on the laurels I think Apple need to really sort of try and get back some of that market share and obviously now Google are going into it so I think really that's the benefit.

James:
What I'm worried about, obviously, the Joe Rogan News everyone was talking about a few weeks ago is the idea that one of these players could just own the whole podcasting market, it doesn't appeal to me. I personally like the fact that, you know, podcasting still has this independence. You know, if you're on YouTube or you're on Facebook and you spend ages growing an audience, you're really at their mercy, they can change your algorithm and suddenly your earnings can go down. They could cut you off or, you know, you can say certain things and can't other thing. I think that's the benefit of podcasting right now, it's a people's media, really. And you can, you can you really create a podcast from whatever you want. So, I think it'd be great shame to see that change. But we'll see, I don't know. I wish I could predict what's going to happen. I think a lot of people say, is it too late to start podcasting as well? I think there's still opportunity there. If you look at the number of podcasts, a million, it's just been announced. Sounds a lot, but actually there's still much opportunity when you compare it to other platforms.

Andrew:
I guess if you were to compare it to the number of blog posts that have ever been written, it's it's still a drop in the ocean, really, isn't it?

James:
Yeah. The number of Instagram accounts, the number of YouTube accounts, Facebook pages, a million still a tiny number compared to the number of competitors on these other platforms. So I think, yeah now is definitely a good time to try and get in as it is a company, because, you know, there's still opportunity to get breakthrough. You're not gonna be completely drowned out.

Andrew:
Yeah. I've felt for some time now that companies really need to be thinking more like a media company, whether you were, or are in media or not, you need to have some sort of media/publishing aspect to what your marketing is. And that has to go beyond just posting on blogs and things like that. And I think podcasting is one of those channels which which is relatively easy to get started with. You could start with a phone and a mic plugged into your phone. You don't even need the mic plugged into your phone, to be perfectly honest, do you? And it's obviously pretty straightforwards then to get content uploaded to the platforms like podcast.co because that does all your distribution for you. Get it out to Apple podcast, Google, Spotify, etc.. And there's about eight platforms, I think, isn't there that it all gets sent out to.

Andrew:
So the accessibility for this seems fairly straightforward. You know, it's the other thing. It's not like video where people can't stand the sight of themselves on video. You know, I think most people have probably got used to the sound of their own voice, it never sounds quite the same, but again, one of those factors.

James:
Everyone says that. But, do I really sound like that? Yeah, yeah you do.

Andrew:
Don't worry about it, because you've been like that for 20 years or whatever.

James:
Yeah. Yeah, completely.

Andrew:
Good. Well, that's been really interesting. I see a bright future for podcasting, we're really at the thin end of it and we started this show last year, like I say, I think we're up to about the fifteenth episode now. And we've been using Matchmaker as well, which has enabled some some good interviews over the last couple of episodes and we've got a few more lined up. So we're looking forward to seeing how that evolves and how that grows over the coming weeks and months.

Andrew:
So, James, just tell us where people can find out a little bit more about you. We've talked about some of your platforms, but just run through those for us and the listeners will be able to look those up and take a closer look.

James:
Of course. Yep. So check out the site's radio.co, podcast.co and matchmaker.fm. Matchmaker's completely free sign up to at the moment, which is fantastic. If you want to maybe not start your own podcast, but get some experience first, being a guest on other people's, is another good way to get involved with it. And also, if you want to reach out to me directly, all of my social handles are listed on Jamesm.com/connect.

Andrew:
And it's probably worth just pointing out, you post a lot on YouTube. You've got quite good content on YouTube, a lot of good stuff around getting started for podcasting, how to run interviews and things like that. I must admit I'm still getting used to that. There's there's plenty of advice and guidance on your YouTube channel as well, so that's worth checking out too.

Andrew:
All right. So thanks again, James. Really appreciate your time. Thanks for joining us today on the Clientside podcast. Appreciate your time.

Andrew:
So thanks, James, for joining me today on the clientside podcast. We're still learning here as we add to our own podcast catalog. But it's actually a lot of fun, not as difficult as you might think and a great opportunity to extend your network and meet new people. James talked about Apple's dominance in the podcasting space, but with Spotify's huge investment in podcasts and Google clearly stepping up their own podcasting distribution as James said, Google have the search Know-How. So what that means for your visibility online could be an absolute game changer. I would definitely advocate repurposing your content wherever you can. We'll start and add some video to this show over the next few episodes. But, there's a saying that we often talk about known as cope or C.O.P.E. create once, publish everywhere. Once you've created your content, you've already put the time into it so you should then be able to break it down into snippets for audio, video, text, even just images with quotes can go a long way to help extend your reach. Don't forget to check out James' details. Look him up at podcast.co and his latest venture, which is matchmaker.fm. We'll have links to all of these and more in the show notes which you'll find at adigital.agency/clientside.

Andrew:
Thank you again for checking out today's episode of the Clientside podcast. I really hope you found it a useful conversation with some actionable steps that you can apply in your business, if you can spare just a few minutes of your time please do look us up on Apple podcast, search for the Clientside podcast by A Digital and leave us a five star rating and if you can, leave us a quick review. I'd love to hear your feedback and would really appreciate your support. If you're interested in learning more about A Digital and how we might be able to work together, head across to our web site at adigital.agency and complete our online scorecard so you can benchmark your own digital performance. You'll get a free personalized report sent to you by email. And I can learn more about you and your business and the particular challenges you're facing. We can then follow this up with a free call to map out your priorities, either on the phone or over Zoom, with absolutely no obligation. Thank you so much, everybody. I'm really grateful for you tuning in. If you have any comments about this episode or any previous episodes of the Clientside podcast, then drop me a line to Andrew@adigital.co.uk or head across to our website at adigital.agency/clientside.. See you on the next show. Cheers.

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I think the first thing to do is really ask the question, who is your audience going to be and what sort of podcast do you want? Decide what you want and then it's a case of right, how do we measure success of this?

James Mulvany Tweet